Clouds & Aerosols

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Clouds and aerosols are the non-gaseous constituents of the atmosphere. Aerosols enter the atmosphere through both natural and anthropogenically driven processes, and they can have a strong impact on the planet's energy budget through absorption and scattering of incoming solar radiation. Aerosols act as critical nuclei for cloud droplet formation, making their physical and chemical properties a major focus on ongoing research, especially with respect to Climate Change. Research topics in the department include those impacts on climate and climate change, changes in cloud and aerosol formation due to climate change, the physical and chemical processes of aerosols, and the numerical modeling of radiative transfer and cloud microphysics.

Faculty

Kenneth Bowman

Kenneth Bowman

David Bullock Harris Professor of Geosciences

Atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric ozone, climate dynamics, satellite meteorology

Sarah Brooks

Sarah Brooks

Professor

Atmospheric aerosols, chemical and physical processes of aerosols

Xiaohong Liu

Xiaohong Liu

Professor

Aerosols, cloud microphysics, aerosol-cloud interactions, climate model development, and climate modeling

Anita Rapp

Anita Rapp

Associate Professor

Satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, cloud radiative effects, global water and energy budget

Ping Yang

Ping Yang

Professor, David Bullock Harris Chair in Geosciences

Interim Associate Dean for Research

Atmospheric radiative transfer, remote sensing, numerical modeling of the optical properties of nonspherical particles and its application

Renyi Zhang

Renyi Zhang

University Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Sciences

Harold J. Haynes Chair in Geosciences

Kinetics and mechanisms of gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions, lab studies of properties of atmospheric aerosols, atmospheric measurements of trace gas species and aerosols, assessment of aerosol-cloud interaction, lightning chemistry